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Mar/11/2014 - 02:07:53 am

Plantar Fasciitis & Ankle Pain


You doctor or podiatrist can help you discover the cause of your condition. After the cause has been determined, your doctor will advise you on the best plantar fasciitis pain therapy. Most of the time, plantar fasciitis pain therapy is easily conducted at home with exercise, rest and relaxation. Sometimes staying off your feet for a given amount of time is the best form of plantar fasciitis pain therapy. Other times, a doctor may tell you to apply tape across the plantar fascia located just in front of the heel where the arch begins to allow the inflammation to subside and the foot to heal correctly.

First check your shoes for too much midfoot flexibility and check your training for changes. A detailed evaluation of changes in your training is necessary. You should start with what is called "relative rest" which means a decrease in workout intensity, duration of session and decrease in the number of sessions per week. The most important part of self treatment for this condition is being sure that your shoes offer sufficient stability and are optimal in controlling the forces that contribute to plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. Check your running shoes to make sure that they are not excessively worn. This is vital!

Many people with Plantar Fasciitis experience a sharp heel pain in the morning, when taking the first steps after getting out of bed. This pain comes from the tightening of the plantar fascia that occurs during sleep. Stretching and massaging the plantar fascia before standing up will help reduce heel pain for the rest of your day! Massaging the plantar fascia can be done simply by rolling a tennisball (or rolling pin) under the foot, all the way from the heel to the toes. Keep rolling the ball or pin under the foot for about 5 minutes.

Inappropriate footwear is the No. 1 cause of plantar fasciosis. Footwear that possesses toe spring and a tapered toe box holds your big toe in an adducted and extended position. In this position, your abductor hallucis muscle—the muscle responsible for moving your big toe away from your foot’s midline—pulls on a foot structure called the flexor retinaculum and may restrict blood flow through your posterior tibial artery, the vessel that carries blood to the bottom of your foot. Tissues in the sole of your feet begin to degenerate as blood supply to this area is decreased.

A heel spur is a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone. My foot X-ray showed two heel spurs extend forward by almost a half-inch. Although they can be painless, mine were not. It felt like a knife or pin sticking into the bottom of my feet when I stood up. The sharp pain returned when standing up after sitting for a prolonged period of time. The cause of the pain was not the heel spur itself but the soft-tissue injury from the bony growth as it digs into the heel pad and plantar tissue.plantar fasciitis stretches

If you experience extreme discomfort or pain on your heel, it could be caused by plantar fasciitis. This disorder is a result of inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick band of connective tissue running from the bottom of the heel to the toes. The classic symptom of this foot disorder is intense heel pain that accompanies the first few steps in the morning or after resting. Use ice packs to reduce inflammation. The ice will soothe the pain and alleviate the symptoms. Dip your foot in a bucket filled with ice, or apply ice packs to your heel.

Plantar fasciitis pain can last six to 18 months or longer, so it is important to be patient. Your podiatrist will evaluate your feet to determine if you need to have special supports, called orthotics, inserted into your regular shoes or your running shoes. You may be asked to stop carrying heavy weights or participating in sports until your foot heals. Your podiatrist may refer you to a physical therapist to start a series of exercises to strengthen and stretch your foot and calf muscles, including wall stretches and stair stretches. Medical Interventions.

In general, plantar fasciitis is a self-limiting condition. Unfortunately, the time until resolution is often six to 18 months, which can lead to frustration for patients and physicians. Rest was cited by 25 percent of patients with plantar fasciitis in one study as the treatment that worked best. 3 Athletes, active adults and persons whose occupations require lots of walking may not be compliant if instructed to stop all activity. Many sports medicine physicians have found that outlining a plan of “relative rest” that substitutes alternative forms of activity for activities that aggravate the symptoms will increase the chance of compliance with the treatment plan. 4

The first step is to stop the activity that caused the pain The person should alter his or her activity or exercise routines to reduce stress on the plantar fascia ligament. You should rest your feet, keep the foot elevated and use ice repeatedly during the first part of treatment. Patients should try not to run or walk too much, instead try swimming or cycling. Regular activity should be increased slowly avoiding pain with each increased level. Common anti-inflammatory medications such as asprin may reduce discomfort, although patients must make sure they get medical advice prior to starting any medication.

After stretching the related or connected parts of the plantar fascia, you can now head to a cross leg stretch that actually focuses on the arch of the foot. To do such a plantar fasciitis stretches, you need to sit down on a comfortable surface. Take one leg, bend it and place it on top of the other foot, currently stretched. Pull your toes up and hold the back of the foot with the other hand. Feel the stretching of the back of the feet. This directly applies a stretching pressure on the plantar fascia and can be very good in keeping it in good shape.plantar fasciitis sock
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